Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Update – September 2013

Milepost 31 speaker series – Learn about the buildings that support the tunnel systems

 

Scale Bertha model at Milepost 31 in Pioneer Square

The new SR 99 tunnel’s vital functions – safety, lighting and ventilation systems – will be controlled from buildings located at both ends of the tunnel. Crews have already begun construction of the building at the south end just to the east of the tunneling machine’s launch pit. Join us for the next speaker series to learn about these sophisticated buildings, how they are sustainably designed, and what the completed structures and their surroundings will look like.

 Thursday, Sept. 5

6 to 7 p.m.

Milepost 31

211 First Ave. S., Seattle

Admission is free.

 After the talk, be sure to leave enough time to explore the rest of the First Thursday Art Walk in Pioneer Square. Milepost 31 is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and stays open until 8 p.m. on First Thursdays. Free parking is available for First Thursday art walk patrons in Pioneer Square. Please visit www.FirstThursdaySeattle.com for more information about participating garages.

And don’t forget you can track Bertha’s journey to Seattle on Twitter by following @BerthaDigsSR99.

 

Waterfront Seattle: Street + Transit Update

2013_0626_Street+Transit_Image

On June 26, join the City of Seattle and our community partners for an interactive update on Alaskan Way design and options for waterfront transit. Building on more than two years of community input, the project team will share street design and local waterfront transit updates for community feedback. Please join us on Wednesday, June 26, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Washington State Convention Center, Room 3A. Event is free and open to the public. For additional information or to RVSP, visit waterfrontseattle.org, email info@waterfrontseattle.org or call 206-499-8040.

 

STREET + TRANSIT UPDATE (PDF)

Join us on Wednesday, June 26, for an interactive update on Alaskan Way design and options for waterfront transit.

Building on more than two years of community input gathered during conceptual design, the project team will share street design and local waterfront transit updates for community feedback. The event is free and open to all – see you there!

 

Street + Transit Update
Wednesday, June 26

5:30 – 7:30 pm
Washington State Convention Center

800 Convention Center, Room 3A

Event is free and open to the public.

Click here to RSVP.

Find directions here.

 

Questions or comments?

info@waterfrontseattle.org

206.499.8040

waterfrontseattle.org

 

HOSTED BY: City of Seattle’s Departments of Transportation, Planning & Development, and Parks & Recreation

 

For special accommodations, including interpretation, please contact info@waterfrontseattle.org or 206.499.8040.

Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing may make a request for alternative formats through the Washington Relay Service at 7-1-1.

Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Update – May 2013

www.FirstThursdaySeattle.comCutterheadMilepost 31 Speaker Series – Preparing for the SR 99 tunneling machine’s summer launch

After a 5,000 mile journey from Japan and 10 days of unloading, Bertha, the world’s largest-diameter tunneling machine, is officially on Seattle soil.  Join us at this month’s speaker series for a project update including a behind-the-scenes look at the machine’s arrival. We’ll also talk about what’s next for Bertha as crews assemble her 41 pieces in the launch pit and prepare for the start of tunneling this summer.

6 to 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 2

Milepost 31

211 First Ave. S., Seattle

Admission is free.

After the talk, be sure to leave enough time to explore the rest of the First Thursday Art Walk in Pioneer Square. Free parking is available for First Thursday art walk patrons in Pioneer Square. Please visit www.FirstThursdaySeattle.com for more information about participating garages.

What’s next for Bertha, the SR 99 tunneling machine

Now that spring is here, get outside and take a self-guided walking tour along the paved path west of the work site and watch as crews prepare to reassemble Bertha. Many of Bertha’s pieces including the cutterhead and trailing gear are visible in the work zone. Spot them now before the massive red crane begins lowering Bertha’s pieces into the launch pit. Reassembling and testing the machine will take two to three months. Bertha is scheduled to start digging this summer.

Building one road above another: the South Atlantic Street overpass

Crews continue to build the new South Atlantic Street overpass over SR 99 to the west of Seattle’s stadiums. The wooden forms you see are called falsework, which is a temporary structure that creates a mold where crews will pour concrete to build the permanent structure. Scheduled to open in late 2013, this overpass will allow traffic to bypass frequent train blockages on South Atlantic Street.

For more information about the Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Program, visit www.alaskanwayviaduct.org. You can also track Bertha’s progress on Twitter by following @BerthaDigsSR99.

Get ready, Seattle – Bertha’s here

BerthaThe journey started in Japan with a single ship. It ended 5,000 miles later in the waters of Elliott Bay, with the much-anticipated arrival of Bertha, the massive machine that will dig the SR 99 tunnel beneath downtown Seattle.

The five-story-tall machine arrived in Seattle on April 2 aboard the Jumbo Fairpartner, the 475-foot-long vessel that carried it across the Pacific Ocean from the manufacturing plant in Osaka, Japan. Built by Japanese firm Hitachi Zosen Corporation, Bertha was taken apart into 41 separate pieces, the largest weighing about 900 tons, before being loaded on the Jumbo Fairpartner last month.

WSDOT will have a live webcam pointed at Bertha’s arrival point once the ship is berthed, along with a map of locations where the public can view the machine’s arrival and unloading. Both can be found on a Web page devoted to tracking Bertha’s journey. The most frequent updates will come via Bertha’s Twitter account. A 10-foot-long interactive model of the machine is on display at Milepost 31, the project’s information center in Pioneer Square, and photos of the machine and construction  in Seattle are also available.

In the coming days, crews will offload Bertha’s pieces at Terminal 46 and transport them to storage areas throughout the work zone, which is just east of the terminal. Reassembly and testing of the machine will take two to three months. Tunneling is scheduled to start this summer.

 

For more information about the SR 99 Tunnel Project, visit www.alaskanwayviaduct.org.